Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Long Beach Honey at the Spring Street Farm Stand



You can now find Long Beach backyard and rescue honey at the Spring Street Farm Stand.  They are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 10-5pm.  You can find the stand at the North East corner of the Spring and Long Beach Blvd intersection.  The honey is brought to you by our own Long Beach Beekeepers.  The current Bixby Hills honey is brought to you by Dick.  Here's the story behind the wonderful raw and spectacular honey...

This batch of honey came from a cutout I did in August on a derelict backyard dresser on Circle Drive in Bixby Knolls. The homeowner said the bees had only been there about two months. Well, as is usually the case, he underestimated. The colony was in a space that was 18 inches by 18 inches and 24 inches deep. And it was solid comb, a lot of it very dark. Had to be a year-old hive.
The homeowner was a great guy and he loved smoking a cigar and watching the bees, but his family objected and he called our rescue line. So as he sat on the patio and enjoyed a cigar, I cut out comb, tied it into frames, scooped and vac’d bees and made a little nuc. Not much brood comb. Tons of honey. Very sweet bees. No stings. A successful rescue.

-- Dick


You can also find flavored honey for just 25 cents each.  Try a bunch of flavors for just a dollar.

Monday, December 3, 2012

Support Long Beach Beekeeping and Urban Agriculture

The Long Beach Environmental Committee is hearing recommendations for change to the city ordinances related to the keeping of bees, chickens and goats.  They last met 11/27/2012 and city staff were requested to present in the first quarter of 2013 draft ordinance changes.  There was a potential survey presented by staff but that has been post-poned until the draft ordinances are presented.

Here is the review in the LB report.  LB Report about city meeting.

The fifth district council member, Gerrie Schipske, has put out an online survey to get a feel for what people think about the proposed changes.  Here is what staff has proposed at the summer meeting.



City of Long Beach

Current and proposed policies on the keeping of backyard chickens, goats and bees [source: City of LB website]
Current
Proposed

Chickens

  • Up to 20 may be kept at least 50 feet from 1 and 2 family residences or 100 feet from multi-family (3+) residences or hotels
  • 1 chicken may be kept as pet at least 20 feet from any dwelling
  • Up to 4 may be kept without required distance from neighboring residence
  • 5 to 10 may be kept at least 25 feet from neighboring residence
  • 11 to 20 may be kept at least 50 feet from neighboring residence
  • 5 or more must obtain one-time permit from Animal Care Services
Goats
  • No more than 1 may be kept at least 100 feet from neighboring residences
  • May not be kept south of Anaheim Street
  • 2 female pygmy goats (only) may be kept without required distance from neighboring residences
  • Must be licensed annually by Animal Care Services
  • Milk products produced are for personal consumption only
Bees
  • Hives must be kept at least 100 feet from neighboring residences and public ways (streets and alleys).
  • Must be kept 10 feet above ground
  • Up to 5 hives may be kept at least 5 feet from property line
  • If a hive is less than 15 feet from a property line, a flyway barrier of at least 6 feet high must be maintained around the hive
  • Hives must be registered with Los Angeles County Department of Agriculture

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Michael Bush Event October 7th: SOLD OUT!

Michael Bush is coming to Long Beach.  The event is already sold out and looks to be a great oppurtunity to get together with other natural beekeepers.

We'll be inspecting hives with him and learning about unlimited brood next management and the 4 steps to keeping healthy bees.

Stay tuned for updates.  Check the monthly meeting page for event details. 

Check out this link for Michael Bush's website.


Monday, August 27, 2012

Honey Tasting and Monthly Meeting This Sun 9/2

Please join us this Sunday for our monthly meeting at 10am.  Following the meeting we'll have a honey tasting where you can learn the difference between store bought honey and the wonders of unprocessed, raw honey from our own neighborhoods.  Here's the agenda.  Hope to see you there.  The honey tasting will start about 11am.

Monday, August 13, 2012

Spreading the Buzz about Bees

We've been to some great events to speak to people about bees.  It's a great way to show people what a hive looks like by bringing our observation hives.  

We're going to be having a great set-up and a Beginning Beekeeping Workshop Sept 8th, Sat, at the Admiral Kidd Farmer's Market 11am.  We were at the Farmer's Market and the bees seem to love the place and really loved the lemonade stand. 


Monday, July 2, 2012

Our Family Bee Adventure


CHAPTER 1 - Bugs and Berries

So technically our family adventure begins with our garden.  It had been doing really well all spring.  Especially our strawberries.  We didn’t plant strawberries last year because, after trying for several years, we finally decided that the only beneficiaries were the slugs who consistently ravaged the berries before they had a chance to fully ripen.  As much as my family loves strawberries, the plants were just taking up valuable real estate in our garden so sadly, we pulled them out.  This year, we found the hanging strawberries.  They were kind of expensive but we bought two anyway.  When we found some cheap planter boxes at a garage sale we realized we could mount those on a wall in our garden and fill them with strawberries too.  So we did.  We had mounds of plump, fragrant, delicious strawberries for our pancakes and for desert and for dipping in Nutela and for sharing and for simply devouring right off the plant.  Many of our berries never made it to the inside of our house, except maybe for the pink juicy goodness smeared all over the kids‘ faces... It was glorious. 

Then all of a sudden our strawberries became small and misshapen.  I had been watering and fertilizing (organic) regularly. In addition, our squash, for the last 5 years easily our most bountiful crop, wasn’t doing anything. And where did all the bees go?  I am no master gardener, but my best guess under the circumstances was pollination. This is peak bee season and I have seen only one bee in our garden in the last month. And it only likes the fennel, which I let flower specifically for the bees.  Prior to that the bees were everywhere. This Spring they were especially fond of the Manzanita blossoms in the draught tolerant portion of our yard. 

Now, based on the various going’s on in our neighborhood, I have a pretty good idea that our local wild bee colonies have been hit pretty hard by exterminators and by vector control lately.  Of course, I have also been loosely following the colony collapse disorder (CCD) mystery (not a mystery anymore-more on that another time) and I didn’t completely rule that out as a contributing factor. The poor bees don’t seem to be catching any brakes over the last few years.  If it isn’t mites or fungus or mysterious sudden death, hysterical people commonly fumigate bees as a matter of standard practice.  Did you know our “health” department advises people to call 911 for swarming bees?   EEEK! A bee SWARM!  Don’t tell me they wont attack because they don’t have anything to defend! Just KILL them! QUICK!

Anyway, our bee adventure technically begins with a love of strawberries AND a long standing sympathy for and appreciation of insects of many kinds.  We have a tarantula (an arachnid, I know) and we had silk worms and moths, stick bugs, raised numerous types of caterpillars and butterflies and we have participated in many butterfly counts and have a growing collection of bugs that the husband and son pin themselves and well, you have the idea.  We like bugs… and strawberries.



A brief conversation and it was decided.  It was time.  We couldn’t rely on feral bee populations in our neighborhood and having bees fit very well with our environmental ethic. Of course this would require detailed study and we also soon understood that we would not be complying with current city codes. We also discovered that there was a growing movement within Long Beach (as well as other cities) for the regulations to be modified to accommodate backyard beekeepers in dense neighborhoods such as ours.

Off to the library then. We checked out a number of dvd’s, and the one I liked best was “Vanishing of the Bees” and NOVA’s “Tales from the Hive” has some spectacular footage.  I perused the “Beekeeping for Dummies” book and decided that it was a keeper so we also went to BioQuip, a local bug lovers super store. Of course they had it, and a different book for the husband too.  Apparently he isn’t a dummy. (cough, cough) In addition, we confirmed that they carry all the necessary beekeeping equipment when we are ready for some bees.  They do not carry live bee colonies though.  We would have to get the bees from somewhere else.

As the days passed and we got into our books and videos, I was becoming more acutely aware that we would probably need advice and possibly some supervision from a local experienced beekeeper.

- Jenni Gomez et. al.

Friday, June 15, 2012

The Maple Village School Visits The Bees

This week Henry in our group received a wonderful thank-you letter from the Maple Village School. We love to do educational events because it's a wonderful to see the kids excited about the bees.


The kids came over to the bee yard at Farm Lot 59 to see the bees and they look like they had a great time.



Thursday, June 14, 2012

LBLB at the Green Festival Long Beach

We had another great opportunity to get the word out about urban beekeeping this past weekend.  Henry, Selene, Barbara and Jaime helped at out booth and answered a bunch of questions.  There were even some people that were interested in beekeeping and were inspired to start after the information they received.  I'm sure the next meeting will have a bunch of new people.

Support Backyard Beekeeping!

This week the Long Beach Sustainability Office is holding public comment meetings for the proposed code changes that will support having chickens, goats and bees in your backyard.  The next meeting will be tonight 6:30pm at the Whaley Community Center, 5620 Atherton Street, Long Beach, CA

Current and proposed policies on the keeping of backyard chickens, goats and bees
For Public discussion at Community Meetings 6/11/12 and6/14/12


Current
Proposed
Chickens
·    Up to 20 may be kept at least 50 feet from 1 and 2 family residences or 100 feet from multi-family (3+) residences or hotels
·    1 chicken may be kept as a pet at least 20 feet from any dwelling
·    no crowing fowl
·    Up to 4 may be kept without required distance from neighboring residence
·    5 to 10 may be kept at least 25 feet from a neighboring residence
·    5 or more must obtain one-time permit from the animal care services (considering $25)
Goats
·    No more than 1 may be kept at least 100 feet from neighboring residences
·    May not be kept south of Anaheim Street
·    2 female pygmy goats (only) may be kept without required distance from neighboring residences
·    Must be licensed  annually by animal care services (considering $?)
·    Milk products produced are for personal consumption only
Bees
·    Hives must be kept at least 100 feet from neighboring residences and public ways (streets and alleys)
·    Must be kept 10 feet above the ground
·    Up to 5 hives may be kept at least 5 feet from property line
·    If a hive is less than 15 feet from a property line, a flyway barrier of at least 6 feet high must be maintained around the hive
·    Hives must be registered with the Los Angeles County Department of Agriculture ($10/year)

The turn out for the Monday meeting was great but we need more people.  The proposed changes will then be brought to the Environmental Committee on Tues June 26th.  Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come and support the changes.  The more people that come in support, the better our chances are that the committee will support bringing the issue before the Long Beach City Council.  The Sustainability Office, lead by Larry Rich, has done a spectacular job reviewing other city codes and we need to support his effort and say thank-you for bringing the issue forward.



Monday's First Public Comment Session with Larry Rich